Upcoming event

Effect of nocturnal hypoxia on nocturia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

Publication: Int Neurourol J. , Volume 23, Issue 2, June 2019, Pages 161-168





Purpose

To identify the association between nocturia and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), we compared results of polysomnography (PSG) with the presence or absence of nocturia in patients with suspected OSA.

Methods

Patients underwent PSG for suspected OSA. The International Prostate Symptom Score and quality of life (IPSS/QoL) questionnaire was evaluated to assess voiding symptoms that may affect sleep quality. The results of PSG were compared between patient groups with or without nocturia.

Results

In logistic regression analysis, age (odds ratio [OR], 1.052; P=0.004), diabetes mellitus (OR, 6.675; P<0.001), mean O2 saturation (OR, 0.650; P=0.017), oxygen desaturation index (ODI) 3 (OR, 1.193; P=0.010), and ODI4 (OR, 1.136; P=0.014) affected nocturia independently among the OSA-suspected patients.

Conclusions

Hypoxia caused by OSA affects the incidence of nocturia. Less desaturated OSA patients with nocturia may require more urological evaluation and treatment for nocturia even after the correction of OSA.


Expert's summary

This study at identifying the association between nocturia and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), by comparing the results of polysomnography (PSG) with the presence or absence of nocturia in patients with suspected OSA.

Patients underwent PSG for suspected OSA, and the International Prostate Symptom Score and quality of life (IPSS/QoL) questionnaire was evaluated to assess voiding symptoms that may affect sleep quality. The results of PSG were compared between patient groups with or without nocturia.

In logistic regression analysis, age (odds ratio [OR], 1.052; P=0.004), diabetes mellitus (OR, 6.675; P<0.001), mean O2 saturation (OR, 0.650; P=0.017), oxygen desaturation index (ODI) 3 (OR, 1.193; P=0.010), and ODI4 (OR, 1.136; P=0.014) affected nocturia independently among the OSA-suspected patients.

The authors conclude that hypoxia caused by OSA affects the incidence of nocturia, and that less desaturated OSA patients with nocturia may require more extensive urological evaluation and treatment for nocturia even after the correction of OSA.

Expert's comment

Hopefully this article helps to motivate neurologists, pneumologists or other non-urologists that see patients with OSA to pay attention to their urological situation and consider referral to an interested and motivated urologist with knowledge about nocturia and its causative factors. 

Tags: Apnea, Hypoxia